More Quilts Displayed at International Quilt Market in Pittsburgh

In my last post, I showed you pictures of some of wonderful quilts displayed at the Spring International Quilt Market in Pittsburgh. I didn’t want to visually overload you, as they are all awesome, so I saved some to show you today.

Alices Kitchen Miki Murakan Quilt

“Alice’s Kitchen” by Miki Murakami of Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa Pref, Japan. In the story of Alice in Wonderland, there is no kitchen scene. Miki thought it would be fun if a kitchen appeared in the world of Alice so she imagined the kitchen in this quilt. The techniques used were pieced, appliquéd, satin stitched, quilted, fused, and embroidered.

Larry Jennifer Day Quilt

“Larry” by Jennifer Day of Santa Fe, NM, depicts Jennifer’s sewing machine repairman. She took the photograph of him as he repaired her machine one day. You can tell that Larry loves what he does. The techniques used were phototransferred, free-motion embroidered (with less than 1/4″ between stitches).

Boy and his best friend Jennifer Day

“Boy and His Best Friend” also by Jennifer Day of Santa Fe, NM, is a quilt of Jennifer’s 10-year-old-son and his Old English Sheepdog, B Bear, who spend hours together every day. Jennifer printed a photograph of them on fabric and covered their images with 58 different colors of thread. The techniques used were photo transferred and free-motion embroidered (with less than 1/4″ between stitches).

Lincoln Virginia Greaves Quilt“Lincoln” by Virginia Greaes of Roswell, GA. This design was based on a public domain photograph in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Virginia was inspired by Lincoln as a great defender of the U.S. Constitution, a document she has been reading lately to understand our founding fathers. This image of Lincoln reflects the determination with which he pursued his goals in addition to the stress that he endured in that struggle. This quilt is available for purchase.

The quiltmaker Jennifer Bowker

“The Quiltmaker” by Jennifer Bowker of Garran, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. The techniques used were machine pieced, raw-edge appliquéd, free-motion quilted, and painted.  Jennifer designed this quilt to honor Margaret Rolfe, the founder of the first Australian Quilt Guild, Canbrella Quilters and whose designs brought Australia into the quilting world. She views a quilt landscape that melds traditional blocks with her own designs.

Cosmic Tango Paulette Landers

“Cosmic Tango” by Paulette Landers of Camp Nelson, CA. This is from Paulette’s series “Journals from Mars.” These are her friends from Galaxia, a small world in the vicinity of Planet Mars. They are a joyous people who have evolved in complete harmony with their surroundings and every occasion is a cause for celebration. (Maybe we should all move to Mars.) The techniques used were machine piecing, turned-edge and raw-edge machine applique and machine quilting.

I hope that you enjoyed seeing these quilts as much as I did! I indicated which of these quilts were for sale, but have no way of knowing if they are still available. They are all so wonderful!  I also provided links to the websites of these quilters that have sites. I hope that you check them out – these are some pretty amazing women.

Pittsburgh View Phyllis Dobbs
Pittsburgh is a beautiful city for Quilt Market and I enjoy visiting there. One evening, I went to dinner across the river (one of the many bridges) and took the cable car to the top of the mountain on the other side. This is the view from my table – a spectacular view and great weather for dining outside.

Please check back as I’m working on another post from Quilt Market about some new products for quilt techniques from one of my favorite companies, June Tailor.

Houston Quilt Market, Part 2 – Spectacular Quilts Exhibited!

I promised to show some of the spectacular quilts on exhibit at the Houston International Quilt Market in the first part of my Houston Quilt Market blog post. These are just some of the amazing quilts exhibited. I’m always awed at the beauty of the quilts and the talent involved to create them.

Monarch Butterfly quilt Gloria Hansen

Monarch: About to Fly by Gloria Hansen of East Windsor, NJ. This quilt is a digital painting based on a photograph of a Monarch that she took before it flew away. The techniques are digital painting, machine piecing and quilting.

Bromeliads quilt at Houston Quilt Market by Deborah Beatty

Etherium Botanica Bromeliads – by Deborah Beatty of San Jose, CA. This quilt is based on her photography. The technique is digital painting, machine and hand piecing, machine quilting, and hand painting.

Desert Daze by Debra Crine quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Desert Daze – by Debra Crine of Marco Island, FL. This quilt was inspired by beautiful colors and landscapes of the southwest, with southwestern motifs added after the design was complete. The techniques used were paper piecing, fusible applique and machine quilting.

In my mind quilt at Houston Quilt Market

In My Mind – by Eun-Suk Lee, Cheong-Ju-Si, Chung-Buk, of the Republic of Korea. This quilt was created to show a red line of hope leading to the clarity that traditional Korean patterns have a place in modern quilting and to be a Korean artist in a Western art form.

Heidis Schlowers orchid quilt on display at Houston Quilt Market

Heidi’s Schlowers – by Andrea Brokenshire of Round Rock, TX. This quilt was inspired by the beautiful Cattleya Orchid and a child trip with her sister to Disneyland. The techniques were hand painted silk applique fused on a pieced batik confetti background, machine quilted and thread painted.

Apple Blossom Dance Quilt by Maggi Weiss at Houston Quilt Market

Apple Blossom Dance – by Maggie Weiss of Evanston, IL. Powdery spring blossoms inspired this quilt. The techniques were torn fabric, applique and machine quilting.

3D Sunflowers Quilt at Houston Quilt Market

3-D Sunflowers – by Martha DeLeonardis. Design source – a vintage sunflower block quilt. The techniques used were turned edge woven fabric, machine pieced, applique and quilted.

Tree of Life Quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Tree of Life – by Allison Lockwood of Shell Beach, CA. This quilt was inspired by the Tree of Life that is an important symbol in nearly every culture and a trip to Thailand. Techniques are hand appliqued, hand quilted, embellishments applied by hand.

Synergy Quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Synergy – by Nancy Sterett Martin and Karen Sistek of Owensboro, Ky. They were inspired by a photograph of a close-up of a poppy in creating this quilt. The techniques are hand painting on silk and machine quilting.

Tree Quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Tree – by Kathy York of Austin, TX. This quilt was inspired by the thought that if buildings could dance, they would upon the sight of such a lovely tree. The techniques were fusible applique, machine and hand quilting, and hand embroidery.

Prairie Grass Quilt

Prairie Grass – by Frieda Anderson of Elgin, IL. This triptych was inspired by the mid-west fields and prairies of Frieda’s hometown area and swaying in the wind on a spring day. The techniques used were fused collage and machine quilting.

Flowers for Me Diptych quilt

Flowers for Me Diptych – by Lynn H. Woll of Tacoma, WA. This quilt was inspired by a bouquet of flowers that Lynn bought for herself when she was feeling down. The techniques used were raw edge applique and embellishment.

Mae's Dance quilt by Carolyn Crump

Mae’s Dance – by Carolyn Crump of Houston TX.  Mae Jones, a quilter from Florida, passed away a year ago. Her family gave Carolyn Mae’s sewing machine, fabrics and quilting tools. Carolyn used the machine to make this quilt and named if for Mae. The dancers symbolized the power of needle and thread. The technique used was machine quilting.

As you can see, there were some spectacular quilts on exhibit. There were many more that I did not get pictures of due to time constraints. I hope you enjoyed seeing these few.

Phyllis

Quilt Works of Art – Exhibits at Houston Quilt Market

I wanted to end my review ot the Houston International Quilt Market, held in October, with photos I took of some of the most amazing and beautiful quilts on exhibit. Each quilt was a work of art and produced an “ahhhh”.  I loved reading the inspiration for the quilts and love the wonderful imagination of the creators in designing their quilts.

Eat Your Vegies Quilt from Houston Quilt Market

Eat Your Vegies was created by Judith Roderick of Placitas, New Mexico.  The techniques were hand-painted, machine quilted, pieced, fused and embellished. Judith firmly believes the Beatles’ lyrics from the 60’s – “you are what you eat you know”.

 

An Autumn Breeze quilt at Houston Quilt Market

An Autumn Breeze, created by Akiko Kawata, OIsake, Japan, features machine and hand piecing and is machine quilted. The quilt expresses the scene of an autumn mountain path in Japan.

 

Leaves of Costa Rica quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Leaves of Costa Rica was created by Pam Berry of Lincoln, California.  The techniques include free-motion quilting, hand applique, with bead and yard embellishment. The leaves are two-sided with wire inserted to give form, and produced a beautiful dimension.

 

Serengeti at Twilight quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Serengeti At Twilight by Leona Harden, New Tazewell, Tennessee, used the techniques of raw edge applique, no piecing, and free motion quilting.  This quilt was featured on the cover of AQS’s American Quilter magazine, November 2010 issue. I wrote about this award winning quilt and Leona in a prior blog post. (Leona used a block that I designed in an earlier quilt that was her first awarding quilt).

 

Quilt based on pastoral settings at Houston Quilt Market

Oh Deer, Look What’s Become of Me! was created by Judy Coates Perez, Chicago, Illinois. The technique is whole cloth painted with textile paints and machine quilted. This quilt was inspired by the Medieval hunting paintings of deer in pastoral settings. This also reminds me of the beautiful Medieval tapestries.

 

Quilt on exhibit at Internation Quilt Market, Organic is good for you

Organic is Good for You! Bodil Gardner of Lystrup, Denmark, was inspired by growing her own organic vegetables in creating this quilt. The techniques include applique and machine quilting.

 

Hope Quilt by Ann Pigneri at Houston Quilt Market

 

Hope was created by Ann Pigneri of Louisville, KY. The techniques are paper piecing, machine quilt and bobbin stitching. This quilt is adorned by over 2500 crystals in 6 colors which, unfortunately, do not show up in the photo.

 

Quilt Black-Eyed Susans & Yellow Mexican Hats at Houston Quilt Market

Black-Eyed Susans & Yellow Mexican Hats was created by Mary Ann Vaca-Lambert, Austin, Texas. The techniques used were raw edge applique, thread painted, fused, beaded, and faced. Mary Ann was inspired to create this quilt from the flowers she sees on the way to work. The flower centers were very thick and dimensional and covered with beads.

 

In Bloom Quilt on exhibit at Houston Quilt Market

In Bloom was created by Teresa Shippy, Santa Ana, California, based on the Cherry Blossom Festival of her dreams. Techniques used were hand-painting, stitching and painting. Sweet dreams!

 

Big Bang Theory Quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Big Bang(s) Theory was created by Teresa Sherling, Denton, Texas and is a tribute to the bliss women feel on a good hair day. The techniques include turned-edge and raw-edge applique, hand painted and thread-painted faces, hand-crocheted human hair and free-motion machine quilting. Ah, I love those good-hair days!  Too bad they are matched by bad-hair days.

 

Sea Witch quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Sea Witch was created by Christine Alexiou, Unionville, Ontario, Canada. Techniques include fabric painting, applique, hand sewing, thread painting and beading and uses cotton, silk, organza, cheese cloth, glass beads, shell beads and fabric paint. Christine was inspired by The Little Mermaid to portray a physical beauty while hinting at her deranged creepiness.

 

Really "Wild" Flowers Second Season quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Really “Wild” Flowers! Second Season was created by Sharon L. Schlotzhauer, Colorado Springs, Colorado. The techniques include machine piecing, paper piecing, hand applique, machine applique and machine quilting. This whimsical quilt features 7 colorful, dimensional “wild” flowers with Swarovski crystals in the centers.

 

Capital Hardware Quilt by Frances Holliday Alford at Houston Quilt Market

Capital Hardware, by Frances Holliday Alford, Grafton, Vermont, is based on the beautiful Art Nouveau hinges and hardware of the Texas State Capital. She used the hardware details to print on Spoonflower fabrics for the blocks. Techniques include patching, free-motion quilting and decorative stitches.

 

Vortex in Variation quilt at Houston Quilt Market

Vortex in Variation was created by Nora Ronningen, La Harbra, California. Nora was inspired by the Vortex Quilt exhibited in the American Folk Art Museum. She used Art Nouveau designs to draft her own applique pattern. Techniques include paper piecing, hand applique and hand quilting.

I’m about half way through my pictures and  have some work to finish so I will post the remaining photos shortly. Please check back as they are just as spectacular as the quilts posted here.

Phyllis

The Women’s Museum hosting exhibit “Partisan Pieces: Quilts of Political & Patriotic Persuasion”

Partisan Pieces: Quilts of Political & Patriotic Persuasion
The Women’s Museum: An Institute for the Future, Dallas, TX
November 6, 2008 – March 29, 2009

Opening Reception – Thursday, November 6, time 6 PM – 8 PM.  The reception is free and will feature several speeches about the exhibit.  RSVP for the reception –  rsvp@thewomensmuseum.org

Beginning early November, The Women’s Museum: An Institute for the Future in Dallas, Texas, will host an exhibit entitled Partisan Pieces: Quilts of Political & Patriotic Persuasion as part of the city-wide Quiltmania II.  Curated by the International Quilt Study Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the exhibit features 15 quilts illustrating 19th and 20th century political life from the perspective, and from the needles, of well informed and patriotic American women.  In the days before women’s suffrage, these quilts served as women’s voices. The Women’s Museum is the only national women’s history museum in the nation and is an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution.

Come visit us and read between the stitches to discover the political experiences of these incredible women!  For more information, visit www.thewomensmuseum.org.

The Women’s Museum: An Institute for the Future
3800 Parry Avenue, Fair Park
Dallas, TX 75226
214-915-0860
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. (closed Mondays and most major holidays)
Admission: $5/adults, $4 senior citizens/children 13-18, $3 children 5-12, admission is free for children under 5 and museum members.

Quilt Mania II, the largest collaborative exhibition of quilts, is planned September 26, 2008-April 1, 2009 at 18 Dallas area cultural institutions. More than 300 quilts, from all over the world, will be exhibited during the six month event. Each institution will feature works based on their mission and all the quilts will be compared and contrasted across the exhibitions.

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